Omaha Bryan senior Britney Salcedo, heading for UNL in the fall, works hard for herself and others

Posted on in AIM Newsroom, Tech Education, Youth

Britney Salcedo’s older brother and sister didn’t get the opportunity to go to college. Neither of them could afford it. Seeing her family miss out on higher education due to financial circumstances motivated the Omaha Bryan High School senior to study hard. 

She enrolled in specialized learning academies, participated in afterschool activities and spent hours online applying to scholarships. 

The strategy paid off. Salcedo will attend UNL in the fall to major in Business Administration. Three prestigious scholarships have helped make it possible: a $10,000 Horatio Alger scholarship, an $8,000 Emerging Leaders scholarship, and a $1,500 Tom Miller TeamMates scholarship.    

She is extremely dedicated and not afraid to ask for help,” said Lucely Salgado of the AIM Institute. Salgado coordinates youth-in-tech activities at Omaha Bryan and has watched Salcedo flex her leadership skills during her senior year. 

Salgado continued: “Not only does Britney ask for help for herself, but also her peers if she sees them struggling. Her perseverance, dedication and determination make her a strong Latina.”

Like a lot of successful people, Salcedo enjoys a wide range of interests. In school, her favorite subjects are math, history, culinary studies and Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Academy. Outside of school, Salcedo enjoys baking, going outside, shopping and spending quality time with her siblings. She wants to pursue a career in business or economics because she is interested in the intersection of business growth and world change.  

Salcedo credits AIM for playing a key role in her success. “AIM has affected my life in the most positive way,” she said. “I was able to find things out about myself and where I want my life to be headed. They helped me make college possible.

AIM wishes Salcedo the best of luck as she pursues her dreams and continues to inspire those around her, starting with her family first.

“I will be the first one going to college and I want to be able to show my little brother that it’s also possible for him to go when he graduates high school,” Salcedo said. “I’m so thankful that I get the opportunity to further my education.”